Knitting Technique: (K1. K1tbl. K1.) in next st

Knitting Technique: (K1. K1tbl. K1.) in next st

This little sequence is something that you might find in a knitting pattern. It is a double increase, which means that where there was one stitch on the old needle, there will be three stitches on the new needle.

The parentheses indicate that you have to do all three parts into the same stitch.

It also means that you do not remove the old stitch from the old needle until you have done all three parts.

Here is how to do it.

(K1. K1tbl. K1.) in next st – Part 1

The first part is easy. Simply work an ordinary knit stitch, but DO NOT remove the old stitch from the old needle.

The first Knit-1 part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

The first Knit-1 part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

(K1. K1tbl. K1.) in next st – Part 2

The second part is a bit more tricky.

You have to move the new needle behind the old needle, and position it so that it can be inserted into the back part of the stitch on the old needle.

The second Knit-1-through-back-loop part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

The second Knit-1-through-back-loop part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

Once the needle is through the back part of the stitch, work an ordinary knit stitch. Be careful to pull the yarn through that back loop (it’s easy to latch onto an extra strand of yarn when you are pulling the yarn through). And remember, there is still more to be worked into the old stitch, so don’t remove it from the old needle.

Finishing the second part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

Finishing the second part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

(K1. K1tbl. K1.) in next st – Part 3

You might think that the third part of this sequence is pretty easy – it’s just another Knit-1. But you do have to be careful where you insert the needle to make the stitch.

The third Knit-1 part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

The third Knit-1 part of the K1-K1tbl-K1 sequence

And since this is the final part of the sequence, you can now remove the old stitch from the old needle.

And the sequence is done.

A completed K1-K1tbl-K1 in next stitch

A completed K1-K1tbl-K1 in next stitch

Notice that three stitches on the right hand needle have come out of one stitch below. Also notice what looks like a purl bump in front of the middle stitch – that’s happened between the back-loop-stitch and the final stitch.

So this sequence provides a bit of texture to the knitted fabric.

What does the knitted fabric look like?

This photo shows the sequence worked two rows below the needle.

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted two rows below the needle

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted two rows below the needle

This photo shows another double increase – both of them are worked into the center stitch on the needle.

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted twice on the center stitch

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted twice on the center stitch

And another one.

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted three times on the center stitch

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted three times on the center stitch

Notice how the knitted fabric is getting wider and wider.

And here’s a closeup.

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted three times on the center stitch

K1-K1tbl-K1 knitted three times on the center stitch

Conclusion

Let us compare this version of a double increase to the (K1.P1.K1.) in next stitch double increase. The difference between the two is that the K1-P1-K1 version requires you to move the yarn from the back to the front and then from the front to the back, while with the K1-K1tbl-K1 version the yarn stays in the back. Some folks will really appreciate that feature!

This is an easy double increase. Try it.

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